Cherry's Thoughts...

Managing High Cholesterol

High Cholesterol


“It is a scientific fact that your body will not absorb cholesterol if you take it from another person’s plate.” J

- Dave Barry

Cholesterol is a chemical compound that the body requires as a building block for cell membranes and for hormones like estrogen and testosterone. The liver produces about 80% of the body's cholesterol and the rest comes from dietary sources like meat, poultry, eggs, fish, and dairy products. Foods derived from plants contain no cholesterol.

Cholesterol content in the bloodstream is regulated by the liver. After a meal, cholesterol in the diet is absorbed from the small intestine and metabolized and stored in the liver. As the body requires cholesterol, it may be secreted by the liver.

When too much cholesterol is present in the body, it can build up in deposits called plaque along the inside walls of arteries, causing them to narrow. What are the different types of cholesterol? Cholesterol does not travel freely through the bloodstream. Instead, it is attached to a protein and the two together are called a lipoprotein (lipo=fat). There are three types of lipoproteins that are categorized based upon how much protein there is in relation to the amount of cholesterol.

Low-density lipoproteins (LDL) contain a higher ratio of cholesterol to protein and are thought of as the “bad” cholesterol. Elevated levels of LDL lipoprotein increase the risk of heart disease, stroke, and peripheral artery disease, by helping form cholesterol plaque along the inside of artery walls. Over time, as plaque buildup increases, the artery narrows (atherosclerosis) and blood flow decreases. If the plaque ruptures, it can cause a blood clot to form that prevents any blood flow. This clot is the cause of a heart attack or myocardial infarction if the clot occurs in one of the coronary arteries in the heart.

High-density lipoproteins (HDL) are made up of a higher level of protein and a lower level of cholesterol. These tend to be thought of as “good” cholesterol because they can extract cholesterol from artery walls and dispose of them in the liver. The higher the HDL to LDL ratio, the better it is for the individual because such ratios can potentially be protective against heart disease, stroke, and peripheral artery disease.

Very low-density lipoproteins (VLDL) contain even less protein than LDL.

Total cholesterol is the sum of HDL, LDL, and VLDL


  • Oral: Ground flax seed daily, Barley, Oat Bran, green tea extract
  • Tea: Green Tea, Matcha green tea (more potent that regular green tea so you need less)


Dietary Modifications: Avoid trans-fatty acids. Trans-fats are found in many brands of margarine and in most heavily processed foods, as well as in snack foods such as chips, crackers and cookies, and in the oils used to cook fast-food French fries, doughnuts and movie popcorn. A healthier option would be avocados, almonds, pecans and walnuts.

Eat plenty of soluble fiber. Beans and lentils, apples, citrus fruits, oats, barley, peas, carrots and ground flax seed are all good sources of soluble fiber, which has a powerful cholesterol-lowering effect


·       Fish Oil – make sure it is free of heavy metals like mercury. Check the label

  • Red Yeast Rice (discuss with physician before taking. It can contain a natural substance similar to the drug lovastatin or a contaminant called Citrinin which can cause kidney failure)
  • Coenzyme-Q 10 (CoQ10)
  • Niacin (can cause facial flushing)
  • Blond psyllium

Lifestyle Modifications

  • Get regular exercise like:
    • Swimming or water aerobics
    • Tai Chi/Qigong
    • Walking
  • Lose excess weight
  • Reduce alcohol consumption

Pharmaceuticals: Statins may be required but discuss the risks and benefits with your physician. Cholesterol Absorption inhibitors (cholestyramine) or Evolocumab injections may also be prescribed by your physician.


 Are you ready to do something about your high cholesterol? Online class coming soon "Clean Eating for Healthy Aging". 

Email me at for more information.